Gender equality: its value, and how to achieve it.

We interviewed team members Andreea, Sara and Martin on the theme for this year’s IWD, which is #ChooseToChallenge in helping fight outdated bias and taking action for equality.

Andreea Belciug is our wonderful Project Manager. In overseeing PAB Language’s business relations, Andreea is responsible for ensuring excellent customer service. Andreea contributes to the company's day-to-day operations and our flawless project management process.

Sara Davison is our amazing Relationship Manager at ilc communication and a single working mum with an 11-year-old son.

Martin Rockley is our fantastic Associate Copywriter. Martin has been writing B2C and B2B copy for over 35 years, working in agencies and as a freelancer.

So, why do you think gender equality is important not just for women, but for everyone in and outside of the workplace?

Andreea is the first to answer. “When girls and women get equal education and job opportunities with men, all of society benefits. Studies reveal that a diverse workplace is a more productive workplace. That diversity of course includes gender diversity. There’s plenty of research which shows that businesses who put some women in the top leadership roles do better than businesses with only men in leadership.”

Sara takes up the story. “Gender equality is so important. It has come a long way but there is still so much more to do. We need to show the next generation that men and women should have equal access to opportunities in the workplace, live in a safe and equal society and be treated with respect and fairness.”

Martin is next to speak. “I think it’s about recognising the importance of everyone’s voice and the value of their perspective and experience. Everyone is unique, and everyone’s voice and opinion has value. I think women can often have a different perspective to men, and everyone should recognise this and respect its value.”

What do you think can be done differently or more to influence behavioural change and raise awareness of gender equality?

“First of all, I think we need to be a role model for the next generation, teach children that no matter your gender or what you identify as, you can become whoever you want to be and have the same benefits regardless of your gender. This means removing the stereotypical mindset that women and men qualify only for their gender specific career roles, and teach this in schools so that when the next generation become adults they will be more acceptant and knowledgeable on the subject. Educate people to see that prejudices based on gender, so often seen today, are pointless and have no scientifical basis,” says Andreea.

“I think large high-profile businesses have a responsibility to lead the change in gender equality, leading by example and showing that women are being treated as equals in the workplace. Also educating the next generation on gender equality so that they can effect change.” adds Sara.

“To me, it’s about closing the entitlement gap. Men seem to feel they are always worth it regardless of evidence, whereas women seem to need reinforcement of their abilities before pushing on. Also, too many men are too happy ‘mansplaining’ and loving the sound of their own voice. The answer to both is increased respect for women, and recognition of their experiences, challenges and ambitions. In other words, men could listen more, and talk less.” concludes Martin.